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Sunday, April 19, 2020 | History

4 edition of dynamics of Aristotelian natural philosophy from antiquity to the seventeenth century found in the catalog.

dynamics of Aristotelian natural philosophy from antiquity to the seventeenth century

James Tyler Kent

dynamics of Aristotelian natural philosophy from antiquity to the seventeenth century

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Published by Brill in Leiden .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementedited by Cees Leijenhorst, Christoph Lthy and Johannes M.M.H. Thijssen.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsB
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 482 p. :
Number of Pages482
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22515953M
ISBN 109004122400


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dynamics of Aristotelian natural philosophy from antiquity to the seventeenth century by James Tyler Kent Download PDF EPUB FB2

Similar Items. A dialogue on natural philosophy = Dragmaticon philosophiae / by: William, of Conches, ca. Published: () Aristotle's empiricism: experience and mechanics in the fourth century BC / by: De Groot, Jean, Published: () Aristotle's empiricism: experience and mechanics in the fourth century BC / by: De Groot, Jean.

The Tradition of Aristotelian Natural Philosophy; Two Theses and Seventeen Answers / Christoph Lüthy, Cees Leijenhorst, Johannes M.M.H. Thijssen --Modifications of the Method of Inquiry in Aristotle?s Physics I.

1:An Essay on the Dynamics of the Ancient Commentary Tradition / Frans A.J. de Haas --Latitude of Forms in Ancient Philosophy. The Dynamics of Aristotelian Natural Philosophy from Antiquity to the Seventeenth Century Series: Christoph Lüthy and Hans (Johannes M.M.H.) Thijssen.

This book explores the dynamics of the commentary and textbook traditions in Aristotelian natural philosophy under the headings of doctrine, method, and scientific and social status. This book explores the dynamics of the commentary and textbook traditions in Aristotelian natural philosophy under the headings of doctrine, method, and scientific and social status.

It enquires what the evolution of the Aristotelian commentary tradition can tell us about the character of natural philosophy as a pedagogical tool, as a Price: $ Title: The Dynamics of Aristotelian Natural Philosophy from Antiquity to the Seventeenth Century: Author(s): Leijenhorst, C.H.; Lüthy, C.H.; Thijssen, J.M.M.H Cited by: A History of Natural Philosophy From the Ancient World to the Nineteenth Century.

Get access. The Dynamics of Aristotelian Natural Philosophy from Antiquity to the Seventeenth Century. Leiden: Brill,– Grant, by: Title: The Erosion of Aristotelianism.

Confessional Physics in Early Modern Germany and the Dutch Republic: Author(s): Leijenhorst, C.H.; Lüthy, C.H. Publication year:Cited by: 1. Aristotelian physics is the form of natural science described in the works of the Greek philosopher Aristotle (– BCE).In his work Physics, Aristotle intended to establish general principles of change that govern all natural bodies, both living and inanimate, celestial and terrestrial – including all motion (change with respect to place), quantitative change (change with respect to.

This book is a very good history of Natural Philosophy (what we call "Science" today). It begins in antiquity with the early writings and cultures that engaged in inquiries and investigations of nature and things that we associate with "science" such as mathematics, Cited by: Aristotelianism is the philosophy of Aristotle and of those later philosophical movements based on his thought.

The extent to which Aristotelian thought has become a component of civilization can hardly be overestimated. Read more about Aristotelianism and its impact here. Natural philosophy encompassed all natural phenomena of the physical world.

It sought to discover the physical causes of all natural effects and was little concerned with mathematics.

By contrast, the exact mathematical sciences were narrowly confined to various computations that did not involve physical causes, functioning totally independently of natural philosophy.5/5(1). Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy and Science is a book series to be dedicated totally to the investigation of scientific thought between andthe period that saw the birth of modern scientific method and the origins of the scientific world view.

It covers not only the Aristotelian paradigm of scholastic natural philosophy, but also rivalling Renaissance and seventeenth-century. Aristotelianism (/ ˌ ær ɪ s t ə ˈ t iː l i ə n ɪ z əm / ARR-i-stə-TEE-lee-ə-niz-əm) is a tradition of philosophy that takes its defining inspiration from the work of school of thought, in the modern sense of philosophy, covers existence, ethics, mind and related subjects.

In Aristotle's time, philosophy included natural philosophy, which preceded the advent of modern. The Aristotelian Tradition of Natural Kinds and its Demise is meant to fill this gap. The volume's theme is the emergence of Aristotle's account of species, what Schoolmen such as Thomas Aquinas and William of Ockham did with this account, and the tacit if not explicit Author: Stewart Umphrey.

• M. Clagett, The Science of Mechanics in the Middle Ages (Madison: ). • R.C. Dales, The Scientific Achievement of the Middle Ages (Philadelphia: ). • C.H. Leijenhorst et al. (eds), The Dynamics of Aristotelian Natural Philosophy from Antiquity to the Seventeenth Century (Leiden: ).

• A. Maier, Studien zur Naturphilosophie der Spätscholastik, 5 vols (Rome: ). It situates and explores vernacular Aristotelianism in a broad chronological context, with a geographical focus on Italy.

The disciplines covered include political thought, ethics, poetics, rhetoric, logic, natural philosophy, cosmology, meteorology and metaphysics; and among the genres considered are translations, popularizing commentaries. Abattouy, Mohammed. The Aristotelian Foundations of Arabic Mechanics: From the Ninth to the Twelfth Century.

Dynamics of Aristotelian Natural Philosophy from Antiquity to the Seventeenth Century. Leiden: Brill,– Google Scholar. ARISTOTELIANISM. ARISTOTELIANISM is a school and style of philosophy that flourished throughout the Middle Ages in four languages and over three continents and that persists even now.

Aristotle's school, the Lyceum, continued after his death under the leadership of his students, most notably Theophrastus (c. – c. bce). The vigor and brilliance of the Aristotelian legacy diminished. Mechanics and Natural Philosophy before the Scientific Revolution Walter Roy Laird, Sophie Roux Modern mechanics was forged in the seventeenth century from materials inherited from Antiquity and transformed in the period from the Middle Ages through to the sixteenth century.

Peter and All, hi. My enquiry concerns Aristotle’s contention that simple bodies possess a single motion that is appropriate to them. The context is book one of Copernicus’ work, De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Orbs), Copernicus wants to show that the Earth, understood to be a sphere, possesses, like the known planets - including Sun and Moon.

that in the seventeenth century, Aristotelian science was rejected, and replaced by the far superior Newtonian physics and Copernican astronomy. This rejection has generally been equated with a justified rejection of the whole Aristotelian scheme of things–science and metaphysics all together.

Abattouy, M. The Aristotelian Foundations of Arabic mechanics: From the ninth to the twelfth century. In Dynamics of Aristotelian natural philosophy from antiquity to the seventeenth century (pp. Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill. Medieval and Early Modern Science is maybe the first book series to be dedicated entirely to the investigation of scientific thought between andthat is to say, the period that saw the flourishing of natural philosophy and the birth of the modern scientific method and the origins of the scientific world view.

Natural philosophy encompassed all natural phenomena of the physical world. This book describes how, in the seventeenth century, natural philosophy and the exact mathematical sciences were joined together to make the Scientific Revolution possible and lay the foundations for the emergence of numerous modern sciences in the nineteenth century/5(3).

The seventeenth century also saw an enormous growth of philosophy textbooks in French, written by the tutors of the nobility (themselves often nobles). The movement began in the s with the first French translations of Aristotle’s works, but took off in the s with the first French-language commentaries on Aristotle ’s Physics.

Consisting of nine studies, this volume presents a series of specific insights on Aristotle's influence from Plotinus through Arabic thought. In the first article, Lloyd P. Gerson shows how Plotinus develops much of his metaphysics in conscious opposition to that offered by Aristotle. Steven K.

Strange provides a detailed analysis of the arguments of Enneadin which Plotinus surveys. Basic Aristotelian principles—the four causes, the role of potentiality and actuality, substance and accident—were not only retained by Philoponus but were his central resources for developing a new Christian natural philosophy.

Nonetheless, John Philoponus was a reformer. The Dynamics of Aristotelian Natural Philosophy from Antiquity to the Seventeenth Century. Leiden, Netherlands: Brill, Lindberg, David C.

The Beginnings of Western Science: The European Scientific Tradition in Philosophical, Religious, and Institutional Context, B.C. to A.D. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, This book offers a comprehensive treatment of the philosophical system of the seventeenth-century philosopher Pierre Gassendi.

Gassendi's importance is widely recognized and is essential for understanding early modern philosophers and scientists such as Locke, Leibniz and by: Linked bibliography for the SEP article "Natural Philosophy in the Renaissance" by Eva Del Soldato.

(eds.),The Dynamics of Aristotelian Natural Philosophy from Antiquity to the Seventeenth Century, Leiden: Brill. Lines, D.A., Christia Mercer - - In C. Leijenhorst J. Thijssen & C. Lüthy (eds.), The Dynamics of Aristotelian Natural Philosophy from Antiquity to the Seventeenth Century.

Brill Academic Publisher. Newton’s Training in the Aristotelian Textbook Tradition: From Effects to Causes and Back. The dynamics of Aristotelian natural philosophy from Antiquity to the seventeenth century (Leiden Author: Steffen Ducheyne.

This book discusses the Aristotelian setting of Thomas Hobbes' main work on natural philosophy, "De Corpore" (). Leijenhorst's study puts particular emphasis on the second part of the work, entitled "Philosophia Prima," Although Hobbes presents his mechanistic philosophy of nature as an outright replacement of Aristotelian physics, he continued to use the vocabulary and arg.

I would have given this book five stars if it was only about its author, but it is more of a collection of passages, and in that, it suffers. There are a few more passages, Aristotle's works suffer from being, apparently, personal work-notes of the author—therefore in many cases it can be fairly accused of being more boring than they should/5.

The Philosophy of John Duns Scotus Antonie Vos. This book provides a comprehensive overview of the life and works of John Duns Scotus, arguably one of the most significant philosopher-theologians of the Middle Ages. Examined are his immense contributions to the fields of logic, metaphysics, philosophy of mind and action, and ethical theory.

Aristotelian teleology--his view that a full explanation of natural beings and processes requires knowledge of their purposes or ends--is central to his metaphysics.

Over time, Aristotelian teleology became widely confused with the view that the full explanation of something requires knowledge of God's purpose for that thing. Aside from the challenge of atheism, there are at least two sorts. One of Aristotle’s more famous ideas of natural philosophy is his addition of the celestial “aether” to the four natural elements suggested by Empedocles.

The “aether” is, according to Aristotle, the “greater and lesser lights of heaven.” By this, Aristotle meant the stars of the universe which were visible to him in the night sky.

Comments on Aristotelian Physics, in Th e Dynamics of Aristotelian Natural Philosophy from Antiquity to the Seventeenth Century, ed.

by Cees LeijenhorstAuthor: Paul Richard Blum. The most curious feature of the theory of inertia is the idea that a moving body will persevere in a straight line at constant velocity forever unless some force intervenes to change that motion.(5) The assertion is, as N.

Hanson said, "not axiomatic in the sense of self-evident."(6) The ancient Greeks, observing that carts kept moving only because horses exerted a force on them to pull. Thijssen (eds.), The Dynamics of Aristotelian Natural Philosophy from Antiquity to the Seventeenth Century.

Leiden: Brill Academic Publisher, (= Medieval and Early Modern Science, vol. 5), “Metaphysics Matters: the Origins and Development of Leibniz’s Metaphysics,” Intellectual News. By the end of the 17th Century it was very generally agreed that the universe was entirely made up of small solid corpuscles which moved and changed direction as they bumped and were bumped.

There was, in other words, a consensus in favour of the mechanical philosophy, and the material atom.The Aristotelian-Thomistic Concept of Nature and the Contemporary Debate on the Meaning of Natural Laws Published in in «Acta Philosophica», 6 (), pp.

Giuseppe TANZELLA-NITTI Pontifical Athenaeum of the Holy Cross Faculty of Theology Introduction In the domain of nature, encounters between philosophy and science are Size: KB.Late seventeenth-century scholastics.

Bibliography; Thematic. Aristotelianism in the 17th century. By.